Commendations for detectives in investigation into Yate man’s killing

November 30 2016

TWO detectives who led an investigation into the death of vulnerable Yate man Jason Betts have received crown court commendations.

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TWO detectives who led an investigation into the death of vulnerable Yate man Jason Betts have received crown court commendations.
Detective Sergeant Matthew Lloyd and Detective Constable Peter Fowler were presented with their awards by Avon and Somerset chief constable Andy Marsh and the High Sheriff of Bristol, Helen Wilde.
Mr Betts, 38, was found unconscious at his flat in Celestine Road in March 2015 by a friend and put on a life support machine in hospital.
It was switched off the following day, with a post-mortem examination concluding he had suffered a head injury which had caused a bleed to the brain.
Police said Mr Betts had been exploited by a group of London drug dealers who used his flat as a base to sell drugs.
He was subjected to systematic mental and physical torture and it was after a particularly vicious attack that he died.
Detectives investigating the death were faced with a number of challenges - no CCTV, no apparent witnesses, challenging pathology, difficult forensic recovery and a community that led chaotic lifestyles and didn’t trust the police.
But the team’s hard work and dedication paid off and resulted in two men being jailed earlier this year for their involvement in the incident.
Nathan Skeen, 29, of Lewisham, London, was found guilty at Bristol Crown Court of manslaughter and wounding with intent.
He also admitted charges of being concerned in the supply of class A drugs, including heroin and cocaine. He was jailed for 20 years.
Nixon Apire, 31, of Great North Road, Barnet, admitted wounding with intent in connection with an assault on Mr Betts about a week before his death, as well as being concerned in the supply of class A drugs. He was jailed for 15 years.
The awards to DS Lloyd and DC Fowler recognised the “excellent performance of their duties, overcoming a difficult inquiry, particularly in respect of potentially problematic witnesses”.