Eddie defies the odds to drive again and help stroke survivors get back on the road

August 30 2016

BUSINESSMAN Eddie Ruskin showed determination to walk and drive again after two strokes and a brain haemorrhage threatened to rob him of both skills.

Eddie

BUSINESSMAN Eddie Ruskin showed determination to walk and drive again after two strokes and a brain haemorrhage threatened to rob him of both skills.

Doctors also told him he would be unable to work again. But within weeks, Eddie, of Chipping Sodbury, was walking with a stick and just five months after being taken ill, he was assessed as being safe to drive.

By the end of 2015, the father-of-two was back at work, having passed a Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) advanced driving test and then passing the Institute of Advanced Drivers test with a distinction.

Now Eddie, 47, is helping other stroke survivors get back on the road by sharing his experiences and offering advice.

Eddie, who runs a specialist fibreglass repair and construction business at Dynamic Mouldings in Mayshill, Frampton Cotterell, suffered his strokes at work when he was just 45.

He was unable to use his hands to make a call on his mobile phone but managed to get help and was taken to hospital, only to suffer the brain haemorrhage a fortnight later.

But his cognitive skills were not harmed, resulting in him learning to first walk again and then return to driving.

Cars have played a big part in Eddie’s life, through his work and in his spare time. He was racing just the day before he was taken ill.

He said: “I was told that I would never walk, drive or work again. Life as I knew it was over.

“Only 30 per cent of stroke survivors ever drive again but two months later I was walking with a stick and five months on I was deemed safe to drive.

“Focusing on driving again has really helped me battle back to health. As my car is modified for one-handed driving, I would be lost if it was stolen. It has become so much more than just a car.”

Eddie was advised to get a stolen vehicle recovery device fitted to help police trace and recover his car if it was ever taken and, in recognition of his work to help others, the company Tracker offered to fit one in his specialist vehicle.

Adrian Davenport, the business’s police liaison manager, said: “Eddie’s determination means that he’s made a remarkable recovery, allowing him to get back on the road and now he is working with other stroke survivors to help them drive again.”

Eddie, whose wife Karen and daughters Diana, 18, and Lesley, 15, have given him support in his recovery and rehabilitation, said: “I’m now on a mission to show people that there is life after a stroke. It was devastating when it happened and it’s been hard since but life is totally worth it.”