Effective action taken at Yate academy by new leaders leads to improvements

August 02 2016

SIGNIFICANT improvements have been made at Yate International Academy, with an education inspector highlighting “effective action” taken to help it become a good school.

SIGNIFICANT improvements have been made at Yate International Academy, with an education inspector highlighting “effective action” taken to help it become a good school.
James Sage from Ofsted said the changes made were having an impact, raising the achievement of pupils and improving their attendance and behaviour.
His comments come after the first monitoring visit to the academy (YIA) since it was assessed as being in need of improvement last October.
Mr Sage focused on areas identified for improvements, which related almost entirely to the secondary phase, but he also visited the primary school and nursery at Woodlands, which form part of YIA.
He said there had been a wide range of highly significant changes to the leadership of the school since just before the autumn inspection.”
That included the arrival of Yate principal Paul Skipp and the appointment of the current senior leadership team, most of whom were new to the school.
Adam Williams became chief executive principal of the Ridings’ Federation of Academies, which runs YIA, only in February and a new head of maths joined in May.
Mr Sage said: “One fifth of secondary teachers are new to the school this year, including an almost completely new mathematics department.
“There is now stability in the teaching staff and no full-time teachers plan to leave the school at the end of this year.
“Further improvements have also been made in the primary phase under the continuing good leadership of the primary principal.
“A good programme of training has led to sustained improvements in the overall quality of teaching.
“However, senior leaders know that further improvement is required in some subjects and for some teachers. Teachers who showed a lack of willingness or ability to improve are no longer teaching in the school.”
Mr Sage said all leaders and governors had recognised the sense of urgency needed to improve the academy, realising the curriculum was “not fit for purpose”.
But achievement had now improved and pupils were better behaved around the school.
He said: “Pupils are polite and a pleasure to talk to. Senior leaders have worked successfully to create an ethos and culture in the school where pupils want to do well, feel safe, are valued and take a pride in their community.”
Mr Williams said: “We are really proud of the progress made in the academy in the last year.”