Further efforts being made to build 18 homes on landlocked site in Yate

May 03 2016

DEVELOPERS are making another attempt to build homes on a site in Yate, despite being turned down by South Gloucestershire Council and a planning inspector.

DEVELOPERS are making another attempt to build homes on a site in Yate, despite being turned down by South Gloucestershire Council and a planning inspector.
Last year, Woodstock Homes applied for permission to put 18 homes on a landlocked piece of ground in the town, with the demolition of a bungalow in Cambrian Drive included in the scheme in order to gain access.
 When council planners rejected the controversial proposal, Woodstock appealed against the decision. But the inspector appointed to hear the evidence recently ruled against the company.
Now the firm has re-submitted the application, saying it had addressed the inspector’s concerns.
A planning statement prepared by the Pegasus Group, on behalf of Woodstock, said homes ranging from one to four-bed properties were planned, together with vehicle access, parking and amenity space.
There would be detached, semi-detached and terraced houses and some flats, with the existing bungalow still earmarked for demolition.
When last year’s plan was drawn up, it was met with opposition from Yate Town Council and more than 100 local residents.
The town council said the area was well-used open space and it was “essential” to keep it as such.
It said the housing would affect people living either side of the proposed access, extra traffic would be generated and existing on-street parking would be lost.
There were also questions about the number of homes planned and whether any more housing was needed with so much building already taking place in and around the town.
South Gloucestershire planners had said the proposal “would result in significant and demonstrable harm” and had failed to reach the highest possible standards of site planning and design.
The Pegasus report on the latest application said: “The design that has been developed addresses all the key concerns of the planning inspector included in the appeal decision.”
It said there would be a “convenient, attractive access” for all users, including pedestrians, cyclists and people with disabilities.
There would also be “very limited inconvenience” to the users of an existing cycleway/footway that crosses the access route and reduced priority for vehicles as part of a “living street’”.