Health chiefs urge women to take up cancer screening tests

January 30 2017

A QUARTER of women aged 25-29 in South Gloucestershire failed to attend potentially life saving cervical cancer screening in the past five years.

A QUARTER of women aged 25-29 in South Gloucestershire failed to attend potentially life saving cervical cancer screening in the past five years.

Although the district had the highest percentage take-up in the South West, figures show that 2,226 women in the age group were still not screened.

For all eligible ages - those from 25-64 - one in five missed out. That amounted to 12,699 women.

The number of women dying from cervical cancer has dropped by almost a quarter over the past ten years. 

But the disease is still claiming lives. In 2014, a total of 890 women in the UK died as a result of cervical cancer. 

Now health chiefs are urging women to go for screening when they are invited to do so by their GP. 

Those aged 25 to 49 are offered the test every three years and then every five years until the age of 64.

Screening helps save 4,500 lives every year and early detection prevents up to an estimated 75 per cent of cervical cancers developing. 

Dr Alison Wint, clinical lead for cancer in South Gloucestershire, said: “Screening allows us to identify abnormal cells before they become cancer, which means effective treatment can start , so early detection really does save lives.”