Historic sites in danger of being lost as new register highlights places at risk

November 01 2016

A NUMBER of historic sites near Yate and Chipping Sodbury have been included in the latest Heritage at Risk Register.

A NUMBER of historic sites near Yate and Chipping Sodbury have been included in the latest Heritage at Risk Register.
The document, produced by Historic England, gives an annual insight into the state of the country’s most valued buildings and places that are at risk of being lost as a result of neglect, decay or inappropriate development.
They include some in South Gloucestershire that have been included in previous registers, including Oxwick Farmhouse, north of Yate towards Wickwar, and a coach house and stables at the same location.
Another site is Ragged Castle - or Keeper’s Lodge - at Badminton and the landmark monument to Lord Robert Edward Somerset at Hawkesbury.
All four sites are privately owned and grade two* listed.
The register said the vacant parts of the 1722 Oxwick Farmhouse had some serious decay but emergency repairs had been carried out and talks over full repair were ongoing.
The coach house and stables were built at the same time and although a planning application was approved five years ago, repairs were yet to start.
It described the Ragged Castle folly, which dates from about 1750, as having a shell in poor condition and a lost interior. Talks are going on into repair and stabilisation of the walls.
Meanwhile, there is no agreed solution for repairing the 1846 monument at Hawkesbury, which has been closed to visitors for many years. The tower remembers a son of a former Duke of Beaufort who served with distinction at the Battle of Waterloo.
Duncan Wilson, chief executive of Historic England, said: “Thousands of historic sites are at risk of being lost. Many lie decaying and neglected and the gap between the cost of repair and their end value is growing.”
But he said the organisation would continue to provide grants and work with owners, developers and communities to rescue them.