Improvements at Chipping Sodbury School being made - but not fast enough for Ofsted

October 04 2016

EFFECTIVE action is being taken at Chipping Sodbury School to improve the comprehensive after two consecutive inspections concluded it had to get better.

EFFECTIVE action is being taken at Chipping Sodbury School to improve the comprehensive after two consecutive inspections concluded it had to get better.
Education organisation Ofsted assessed the school as requiring improvement in both 2013 and 2015.
In the first monitoring visit by the watchdog since the 2015 report was published, Ofsted inspector Jim Sage said senior leaders and governors were tackling the areas that had to improve in order for the school to be rated as good.
He said tighter systems and procedures for monitoring the quality of teaching and for evaluating its effect on raising pupils’ achievement had been introduced.
However, although there were indications that raised expectations were starting to improve teaching and learning, he said improvements were inconsistent across the school and the rate of progress was not fast enough. Progress in the sixth form was also slow.
Mr Sage said: “The senior leadership team has been expanded through internal promotions to increase its capacity to secure the rapid improvements the school needs.
“Senior leaders and governors, supported by the local authority, have produced a detailed action plan to tackle all of the areas for improvement identified.
“The actions planned, and in many cases already started, are well considered and appropriate.
“However, the resulting improvements in teaching are not yet fully embedded across the school.”
Mr Sage said the achievement of boys and disadvantaged pupils had to rise further and while the behaviour of students in lessons and around the school continued to be good, more youngsters needed to show positive attitudes to their work.
In the sixth form, almost all students completed their courses with some success and good attention was given to developing their wider employability skills.
But Mr Sage said: “The achievement of many students is not good enough given their starting points.”