Supernatural drama series gives glimpse into historic Horton Court as plans progress for its restoration and re-opening

July 04 2016

VIEWERS of a new BBC1 series can get a close look at historically important Horton Court now that the spooky drama has started. The grade one-listed manor house, near Chipping Sodbury, plays a starring role in The Living and The Dead, which features Colin Morgan and Charlotte Spencer as Nathan and Charlotte Appleby.

VIEWERS of a new BBC1 series can get a close look at historically important Horton Court now that the spooky drama has started. The grade one-listed manor house, near Chipping Sodbury, plays a starring role in The Living and The Dead, which features Colin Morgan and Charlotte Spencer as Nathan and Charlotte Appleby.
Episode one of the six-part supernatural series was shown on TV on June 28, although the entire drama first came out on iPlayer and will continue to be available for a number of weeks.
As reported in Yate and Sodbury Voice in May, film crews were at Horton Court - itself thought to be haunted - for many months.
The National Trust-owned property has lain empty for a number of years and has become a popular location for filming, appearing in series such as Poldark and Wolf Hall.
But there is a £2 million plan to repair and conserve the house, which will eventually allow visitors to once again tour at least part of the premises.
Horton Court was built from the remains of a 12th century Norman hall and donated to the National Trust in the 1940s by Hilda Wills, a daughter of the Bristol tobacco family. It was rented to tenants, with a degree of public access maintained, but was last occupied in 2008 and eventually closed completely four years later due to the building’s poor condition.
Restoration will allow it to be used as a rented house again, with selected parts open to visitors. Earlier this year, an open evening was held for local people to hear about the plans and be shown around the site.
The trust said: “Horton Court is of great significance and we want to ensure that it continues to have a long future. The house will continue to deteriorate without intervention.”
It said a number of options had been considered but having the house fully repaired and leased to tenants was felt to provide the most secure future.
Work is expected to take 18 months, with hopes that tenants may move in by the autumn of 2017.